Evaluation of microwave oven heating for prediction of drug-excipient compatibilities and accelerated stability studies

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Standard

Evaluation of microwave oven heating for prediction of drug-excipient compatibilities and accelerated stability studies. / Schou-Pedersen, Anne Marie V; Østergaard, Jesper; Cornett, Claus; Hansen, Steen Honoré.

In: International Journal of Pharmaceutics, Vol. 485, No. 1-2, 15.05.2015, p. 97-107.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Harvard

Schou-Pedersen, AMV, Østergaard, J, Cornett, C & Hansen, SH 2015, 'Evaluation of microwave oven heating for prediction of drug-excipient compatibilities and accelerated stability studies', International Journal of Pharmaceutics, vol. 485, no. 1-2, pp. 97-107. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpharm.2015.02.071

APA

Schou-Pedersen, A. M. V., Østergaard, J., Cornett, C., & Hansen, S. H. (2015). Evaluation of microwave oven heating for prediction of drug-excipient compatibilities and accelerated stability studies. International Journal of Pharmaceutics, 485(1-2), 97-107. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpharm.2015.02.071

Vancouver

Schou-Pedersen AMV, Østergaard J, Cornett C, Hansen SH. Evaluation of microwave oven heating for prediction of drug-excipient compatibilities and accelerated stability studies. International Journal of Pharmaceutics. 2015 May 15;485(1-2):97-107. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpharm.2015.02.071

Author

Schou-Pedersen, Anne Marie V ; Østergaard, Jesper ; Cornett, Claus ; Hansen, Steen Honoré. / Evaluation of microwave oven heating for prediction of drug-excipient compatibilities and accelerated stability studies. In: International Journal of Pharmaceutics. 2015 ; Vol. 485, No. 1-2. pp. 97-107.

Bibtex

@article{2583d5df75f544b3b6fc9794982250b2,
title = "Evaluation of microwave oven heating for prediction of drug-excipient compatibilities and accelerated stability studies",
abstract = "Microwave ovens have been used extensively in organic synthesis in order to accelerate reaction rates. Here, a set up comprising a microwave oven combined with silicon carbide (SiC) plates for the controlled microwave heating of model formulations has been applied in order to investigate, if a microwave oven is applicable for accelerated drug stability testing. Chemical interactions were investigated in three selected model formulations of drug and excipients regarding the formation of ester and amide reaction products. The accelerated stability studies performed in the microwave oven using a design of experiments (DoE) approach in order to be able to rank excipients regarding reactivity: Study A: cetirizine with PEG 400, sorbitol, glycerol and propylene glycol. Study B: 6-aminocaproic acid with citrate, acetate, tartrate and gluconate. Study C: atenolol with citric, tartaric, malic, glutaric, and sorbic acid. The model formulations were representative for oral solutions (co-solvents), parenteral solutions (buffer species) and solid dosage forms (organic acids applicable for solubility enhancement). The DoE studies showed overall that the same impurities were generated by microwave oven heating leading to temperatures between 150°C and 180°C as compared to accelerated stability studies performed at 40°C and 80°C using a conventional oven. Ranking of the reactivity of the excipients could be made in the DoE studies performed at 150-180°C, which was representative for the ranking obtained after storage at 40°C and 80°C. It was possible to reduce the time needed for drug-excipient compatibility testing of the three model formulations from weeks to less than an hour in the three case studies. The microwave oven is therefore considered to be an interesting alternative to conventional thermal techniques for the investigation of drug-excipient interactions during preformulation.",
author = "Schou-Pedersen, {Anne Marie V} and Jesper {\O}stergaard and Claus Cornett and Hansen, {Steen Honor{\'e}}",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.",
year = "2015",
month = "5",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1016/j.ijpharm.2015.02.071",
language = "English",
volume = "485",
pages = "97--107",
journal = "International Journal of Pharmaceutics",
issn = "0378-5173",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "1-2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Evaluation of microwave oven heating for prediction of drug-excipient compatibilities and accelerated stability studies

AU - Schou-Pedersen, Anne Marie V

AU - Østergaard, Jesper

AU - Cornett, Claus

AU - Hansen, Steen Honoré

N1 - Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

PY - 2015/5/15

Y1 - 2015/5/15

N2 - Microwave ovens have been used extensively in organic synthesis in order to accelerate reaction rates. Here, a set up comprising a microwave oven combined with silicon carbide (SiC) plates for the controlled microwave heating of model formulations has been applied in order to investigate, if a microwave oven is applicable for accelerated drug stability testing. Chemical interactions were investigated in three selected model formulations of drug and excipients regarding the formation of ester and amide reaction products. The accelerated stability studies performed in the microwave oven using a design of experiments (DoE) approach in order to be able to rank excipients regarding reactivity: Study A: cetirizine with PEG 400, sorbitol, glycerol and propylene glycol. Study B: 6-aminocaproic acid with citrate, acetate, tartrate and gluconate. Study C: atenolol with citric, tartaric, malic, glutaric, and sorbic acid. The model formulations were representative for oral solutions (co-solvents), parenteral solutions (buffer species) and solid dosage forms (organic acids applicable for solubility enhancement). The DoE studies showed overall that the same impurities were generated by microwave oven heating leading to temperatures between 150°C and 180°C as compared to accelerated stability studies performed at 40°C and 80°C using a conventional oven. Ranking of the reactivity of the excipients could be made in the DoE studies performed at 150-180°C, which was representative for the ranking obtained after storage at 40°C and 80°C. It was possible to reduce the time needed for drug-excipient compatibility testing of the three model formulations from weeks to less than an hour in the three case studies. The microwave oven is therefore considered to be an interesting alternative to conventional thermal techniques for the investigation of drug-excipient interactions during preformulation.

AB - Microwave ovens have been used extensively in organic synthesis in order to accelerate reaction rates. Here, a set up comprising a microwave oven combined with silicon carbide (SiC) plates for the controlled microwave heating of model formulations has been applied in order to investigate, if a microwave oven is applicable for accelerated drug stability testing. Chemical interactions were investigated in three selected model formulations of drug and excipients regarding the formation of ester and amide reaction products. The accelerated stability studies performed in the microwave oven using a design of experiments (DoE) approach in order to be able to rank excipients regarding reactivity: Study A: cetirizine with PEG 400, sorbitol, glycerol and propylene glycol. Study B: 6-aminocaproic acid with citrate, acetate, tartrate and gluconate. Study C: atenolol with citric, tartaric, malic, glutaric, and sorbic acid. The model formulations were representative for oral solutions (co-solvents), parenteral solutions (buffer species) and solid dosage forms (organic acids applicable for solubility enhancement). The DoE studies showed overall that the same impurities were generated by microwave oven heating leading to temperatures between 150°C and 180°C as compared to accelerated stability studies performed at 40°C and 80°C using a conventional oven. Ranking of the reactivity of the excipients could be made in the DoE studies performed at 150-180°C, which was representative for the ranking obtained after storage at 40°C and 80°C. It was possible to reduce the time needed for drug-excipient compatibility testing of the three model formulations from weeks to less than an hour in the three case studies. The microwave oven is therefore considered to be an interesting alternative to conventional thermal techniques for the investigation of drug-excipient interactions during preformulation.

U2 - 10.1016/j.ijpharm.2015.02.071

DO - 10.1016/j.ijpharm.2015.02.071

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 25746946

VL - 485

SP - 97

EP - 107

JO - International Journal of Pharmaceutics

JF - International Journal of Pharmaceutics

SN - 0378-5173

IS - 1-2

ER -

ID: 132593555